Jennifer A. Prioleau – “I spend a good part of my time thinking about the potential legal uncertainties and risks 3D printing could present as well as mitigation strategies & ways to accelerate 3D printing”

Jennifer A. Prioleau is Division Counsel at HP Inc. for the 3D Printing business. In this capacity, Jennifer oversees general legal matters and is responsible for drafting, negotiating, and advising regarding a broad range of strategic complex commercial contracts involving hardware, software, technology and IP with suppliers, R&D partners, promotional partners, strategic partners, channel partners, OEMs and customers. Should you be a HP MultiJet Fusion customer, chances are that Jennifer was involved at some point in the negotiation!   

In addition to her strong background in legal matters, Jennifer also has a strong commitment to pro bono work and diversity issues. She is a leader on HP’s Pro Bono and Diversity committees and led HP’s involvement in developing HP’s New Jersey Street Law program, a diversity pipeline program that encourages high school students to consider careers in the legal profession. Jennifer is also a member of the Board of Trustees for Volunteer Lawyers For Justice, a New Jersey pro bono organization.

Jennifer, could you let us know about your background and what brought you to 3D printing in the first place?  

What brought me to 3D printing was HP’s strategic decision to dive into 3D printing a few years ago to lead the charge on digitally transforming the global manufacturing industry. HP’s experience, leadership, and innovation in printing for the past forty years is a huge advantage to the knowledge base we apply to new markets such as 3D printing.

Before that, I was the lead trademark and copyright counsel for HP’s Personal Systems Group, where I managed U.S. and International trademark clearance, prosecution, and maintenance as well as advised on trademark and copyright enforcement and infringement matters. Prior to joining HP, I was assistant general counsel managing intellectual property, licensing, marketing and commercial contract matters. I was also an associate at one of the largest intellectual property boutique law firms in the United States prior to going in-house. In that role, I conducted a variety of IP litigation support and transactional work and counselled clients from small startups to Fortune 500 companies.

What was your very first experience with 3D Printing?

Learning about this cool disruptive technology first-hand with an intro to 3D printing at the HP Labs in Barcelona, and spending several days with brilliant HP engineers who tirelessly walked me through the entire 3D printing process from design file to parts unpacking. It was amazing!

You are Division Counsel at HP Inc. serving as lead counsel for 3D Printing business group. Any legal issues (you could talk about) you’ve encountered/had to foresee for the HP Multi Jet Fusion printer?

I spend a good part of my time thinking about the potential legal challenges, uncertainties, and risks 3D printing could present. For example, does the existing legal framework support 3D printing adoption and requirements, and is the existing IP, regulatory, and legal infrastructure up to speed with an advanced technology like 3D printing? However, it’s critical for business lawyers to participate in confronting these challenges as well, so I also develop risk mitigation and business acceleration strategies to advance the 3D printing industry.

Have you run into any challenges from being a woman in 3D Printing?

As luck would have it, it’s International Women’s Day as I write this (coincidentally also my birthday) and I would be remiss if I didn’t reflect upon both the general challenges for women in the workplace (equal pay, career opportunities, raising a family) as well as the unique challenges for women in technology spaces like 3D printing, where quite often you are the only female in a meeting. I’m lucky that HP is a place where diversity and inclusion are cornerstones of its company ethos, and I’m encouraged to see more and more companies following suit.

Anything exciting coming up you’d like us to know about?

Yes! I am co-chairing a 3D printing legal, regulatory and business conference in Chicago June 13-15th. I would love to see the Wi3DP represented! For more info please see: https://www.americanconference.com/legal-regulatory-business-conference-3d-printing/

We have complementary conference registrations to the first 10 Wi3DP individuals to e-mail M.Gerstein@americanconference.com and reference code ACI-JP.

What is the most impressive or impactful use of 3D printing you’ve seen so far?

The life-changing medical use cases for 3D printing, especially those that make life so much better for people with special needs, like custom-printed orthotics and prosthesis that are true works of art.

What do you consider game-changing technologies in Additive Manufacturing?

New platforms that are following the lead of our Open 3D Materials Platform, which allow third-party materials suppliers to collaboratively develop products that provide customers with a more diverse array of materials, drive innovation, and make the economics of 3D printing competitive.

What do you think of the 3D printing industry today?

3D printing is driving a 4th Industrial Revolution that’s on its way to completely transforming the $12 trillion global manufacturing industry and fundamentally changing the way we conceive, design, produce, distribute, and consume nearly everything, with enormous impact to almost every aspect of the economy.

In your opinion, how could we encourage more women to become involved with 3D Printing?

Start early, study hard, find good mentors, and join a 3D printing STEM education program catered to girls who want to change the world.


Favorite 3D tool (could be a software, machine, material…you name it)? The new HP Jet Fusion 300/500 Series 3D printers that print functional parts in full color!

The most exciting thing about your job? Helping HP navigate the regulatory landscape on the path to digitally reinventing manufacturing.

What’s on your 3D Printing wishlist for the next 5 years? A closet of designer 3D-printed shoes custom-produced for ultimate comfort and style!

Another inspiring woman you’d like us to interview? Michelle Bockman, HP’s Global Head of 3D Printing Commercial Expansion & Development.


Thank you for reading and for sharing! 

We invite you to join Women in 3D Printing on LinkedIn and to like our Facebook page for further discussion.

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